EDUTAINMENT

ed·u·tain·ment

/ˌejəˈtānmənt/

entertainment with an educational aspect.

Contains:

Podcasts

 
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  • Spotify

Short Coat Podcast

The Honest Guide to Medical School that offers premed students, medical students, and healthcare learners of all kinds a window into what medicine and medical school is really like. Hosted by Dave Etler and the Students of the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine

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  • Spotify

OldPreMeds Podcast

The National Society for Nontraditional Premedical & Medical Students, Inc., better known by our website name, OldPreMeds.org or simply OPM, is a professional/pre-professional society and educational conduit for non-traditional students who seek to become Physicians.

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  • Spotify

NYIT The Scope

THE SCOPE- produced by the New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine, episodes will focus on the medical school experience and how it helps shape future physicians

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  • Spotify

Medicus Podcast

We are a team of medical students (at Loyola Stritch COM) discussing a broad range of topics with peers, residents, physicians, researchers, administrators, and allied health professionals. You'll hear about hot topics in medicine, practical advice, success strategies, research, and much more. Look for a new episode each Friday!

 

YouTube

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  • YouTube

Mama Doctor Jones

Board Certified ObGyn and Mom to 4, she explores Patient Centered Care & Education related to ObGyn topics

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  • YouTube

Doctor Mike

Actively Practicing Board Certified Family Medicine Doctor living in NYC. My goal is to make the field of medicine relatable, understandable, and fun!

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  • YouTube

Kristina Braly

Board-Certified Anesthesiologist creating Medical Edutainment, Tech, and Lifestyle content

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  • YouTube

Dr Hope's Sick Notes

Emergency Medicine Doctor and Teaching Fellow in the UK. This channel is a light-hearted look at hospitals, the human body and what it's like to be a doctor.

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  • YouTube

Rena Malik

Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgeon. Makes videos on easy ways to improve your bladder health, advice for those pursing a career in urology and ways to be more productive and efficient with your time.

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  • YouTube

America Revere

Surgical intern. Hi, I'm America, the most unorthodox doctor on YouTube.

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  • YouTube

Rachel Southard

I am currently a second-year osteopathic medical student in California. With uploads every Friday, I take you with me on this exciting journey to becoming a physician.

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  • YouTube

Doctor in Training

ObGyn intern, learning medicine one day at a time.

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  • YouTube

Violin MD

Hi, I'm Siobhan! I'm currently a 4th year resident in Canada specializing in rheumatology! Before medicine, I was a violinist so you'll get some music sprinkled into the videos

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  • YouTube

Erin Hays

Hi guys! I'm a urology intern. Subscribe for videos about medical school, finances in medicine, beauty, fashion, and a little bit of everything!

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  • YouTube

Dr Dray

I am a dermatologist and skin care enthusiast with a passion for skin care and a healthy lifestyle. Follow along with me on my Youtube journey. Don't forget to sunscreen and subscribe for more!!

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  • YouTube

Ali Abdaal

I'm a Cambridge University medicine graduate, now working as a junior doctor in the UK's National Health Service (NHS). I used to make videos about life as a medical student but I now vlog about life as a doctor :)

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  • YouTube

Max Feinstein MD

My name is Max Feinstein and I’m an anesthesiology resident at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. My channel is dedicated to sharing information about careers in medicine.

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  • YouTube

Brainbook

Brainbook is a UK charity dedicated to engaging the public, de-mystifying neurosurgery and act as a high-quality educational platform for students, doctors and surgeons across the world.

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  • YouTube

Dr Rupa Wong

I'm a board certified ophthalmologist, with fellowship training in pediatric ophthalmology and adult strabismus. This channel will share my passion for keeping kids and adults seeing well, pearls for private practice management, and tips for working with your husband!

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  • YouTube

Jerad Gardner, MD

I am a dermatopathologist & bone/soft tissue pathologist at Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, Pennsylvania. I was formerly an Associate Professor of Pathology and Dermatology and dermatopathology fellowship program director at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS). 

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  • YouTube

Dr Amna Husain

Dr. Amna Husain is a board-certified pediatrician, IBCLC, and mother. Join her as she embarks on the her newest venture in social media education-a Youtube channel focused on pediatrics and parenting!

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  • YouTube

Anthony Youn, MD

Known as America's Holistic Plastic Surgeon®, Anthony Youn, M.D. F.A.C.S is a nationally-recognized, board-certified plastic surgeon. His goal is to help health conscious men and women over 30 look and feel their best by teaching them a holistic approach to beauty.

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  • YouTube

Dr Mitnaul

The journey from birth to adulthood is filled with waves of change. I'm a father of five and a board-certified child and adolescent psychiatrist by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (Psychiatry), and the American Board of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

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  • YouTube

Dr Melissa Shepard

Hi, I’m Dr. Melissa Shepard! I’m a mama, wife, and medical doctor (MD). I completed my residency in psychiatry at Johns Hopkins and medical school at University of Maryland. I’m passionate about reducing the stigma of mental illness and helping you live an empowered and fulfilled life.

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  • YouTube

Neurogal MD

I’m neurogalMD. I’m a neurologist who is passionate about helping people live fuller lives by teaching techniques that optimize brain health. When you master your brain power, you master your life. I am here to teach you to do just that

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  • YouTube

Dr Cellini

I am currently a Senior Diagnostic & Interventional Radiology Fellow (PGY-6) living in NYC. I post mostly medical stuff mixed in with a little travel vlogs, and of course, Radiology!

 

Books

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  • Amazon

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

When Breath Becomes Air is a powerful look at a stage IV lung cancer diagnosis through the eyes of a neurosurgeon. When Paul Kalanithi is given his diagnosis he is forced to see this disease, and the process of being sick, as a patient rather than a doctor--the result of his experience is not just a look at what living is and how it works from a scientific perspective, but the ins and outs of what makes life matter. This heart-wrenching book will capture you from page one and still have you thinking long after the final sentence.

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  • Amazon

The Emperor of All Maladies by Siddhartha Mukherjee

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, and now a documentary from Ken Burns on PBS, The Emperor of All Maladies is a magnificent, profoundly humane “biography” of cancer—from its first documented appearances thousands of years ago through the epic battles in the twentieth century to cure, control, and conquer it to a radical new understanding of its essence.
Physician, researcher, and award-winning science writer, Siddhartha Mukherjee examines cancer with a cellular biologist’s precision, a historian’s perspective, and a biographer’s passion. The result is an astonishingly lucid and eloquent chronicle of a disease humans have lived with—and perished from—for more than five thousand years.
The story of cancer is a story of human ingenuity, resilience, and perseverance, but also of hubris, paternalism, and misperception. Mukherjee recounts centuries of discoveries, setbacks, victories, and deaths, told through the eyes of his predecessors and peers, training their wits against an infinitely resourceful adversary that, just three decades ago, was thought to be easily vanquished in an all-out “war against cancer.” The book reads like a literary thriller with cancer as the protagonist.

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  • Amazon

An American Sickness by Elisabeth Rosenthal

In these troubled times, perhaps no institution has unraveled more quickly and more completely than American medicine. In only a few decades, the medical system has been overrun by organizations seeking to exploit for profit the trust that vulnerable and sick Americans place in their healthcare. Our politicians have proven themselves either unwilling or incapable of reining in the increasingly outrageous costs faced by patients, and market-based solutions only seem to funnel larger and larger sums of our money into the hands of corporations. Impossibly high insurance premiums and inexplicably large bills have become facts of life; fatalism has set in. Very quickly Americans have been made to accept paying more for less. How did things get so bad so fast?
Breaking down this monolithic business into the individual industries—the hospitals, doctors, insurance companies, and drug manufacturers—that together constitute our healthcare system, Rosenthal exposes the recent evolution of American medicine as never before. How did healthcare, the caring endeavor, become healthcare, the highly profitable industry? Hospital systems, which are managed by business executives, behave like predatory lenders, hounding patients and seizing their homes. Research charities are in bed with big pharmaceutical companies, which surreptitiously profit from the donations made by working people. Patients receive bills in code, from entrepreneurial doctors they never even saw. 
The system is in tatters, but we can fight back. Dr. Elisabeth Rosenthal doesn't just explain the symptoms, she diagnoses and treats the disease itself. In clear and practical terms, she spells out exactly how to decode medical doublespeak, avoid the pitfalls of the pharmaceuticals racket, and get the care you and your family deserve. She takes you inside the doctor-patient relationship and to hospital C-suites, explaining step-by-step the workings of a system badly lacking transparency. This is about what we can do, as individual patients, both to navigate the maze that is American healthcare and also to demand far-reaching reform. An American Sickness is the frontline defense against a healthcare system that no longer has our well-being at heart.

  • Amazon

Complications by Atul Gawande

In gripping accounts of true cases, surgeon Atul Gawande explores the power and the limits of medicine, offering an unflinching view from the scalpel's edge. Complications lays bare a science not in its idealized form but as it actually is―uncertain, perplexing, and profoundly human.

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  • Amazon

My Stroke of Insight by Jill Bolte Taylor

On December 10, 1996, Jill Bolte Taylor, a thirty-seven- year-old Harvard-trained brain scientist experienced a massive stroke in the left hemisphere of her brain. As she observed her mind deteriorate to the point that she could not walk, talk, read, write, or recall any of her life-all within four hours-Taylor alternated between the euphoria of the intuitive and kinesthetic right brain, in which she felt a sense of complete well-being and peace, and the logical, sequential left brain, which recognized she was having a stroke and enabled her to seek help before she was completely lost. It would take her eight years to fully recover.
For Taylor, her stroke was a blessing and a revelation. It taught her that by "stepping to the right" of our left brains, we can uncover feelings of well-being that are often sidelined by "brain chatter." Reaching wide audiences through her talk at the Technology, Entertainment, Design (TED) conference and her appearance on Oprah's online Soul Series, Taylor provides a valuable recovery guide for those touched by brain injury and an inspiring testimony that inner peace is accessible to anyone.

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  • Amazon

The Real Doctor You Will See Shortly by Matt McCarthy

In medical school, Matt McCarthy dreamed of being a different kind of doctor - the sort of mythical, unflappable physician who could reach unreachable patients. But when a new admission to the critical care unit almost died his first night on call, he found himself scrambling. Visions of mastery quickly gave way to hopes of simply surviving hospital life, where confidence was hard to come by and no amount of med school training could dispel the terror of facing actual patients.

This funny, candid memoir of McCarthy's intern year at a New York hospital provides a scorchingly frank look at how doctors are made, taking readers into patients' rooms and doctors' conferences to witness a physician's journey from ineptitude to competence. McCarthy's one stroke of luck paired him with a brilliant second-year adviser he called "Baio" (owing to his resemblance to the Charles in Charge star), who proved to be a remarkable teacher with a wicked sense of humor. McCarthy would learn even more from the people he cared for, including a man named Benny, who was living in the hospital for months at a time awaiting a heart transplant. But no teacher could help McCarthy when an accident put his own health at risk, and showed him all too painfully the thin line between doctor and patient.

The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly offers a window on to hospital life that dispenses with sanctimony and self-seriousness while emphasizing the black-comic paradox of becoming a doctor: How do you learn to save lives in a job where there is no practice?

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  • Amazon

What Doctors Feel by Danielle Ofri

Physicians are assumed to be objective, rational beings, easily able to detach as they guide patients and families through some of life’s most challenging moments. But doctors’ emotional responses to the life-and-death dramas of everyday practice have a profound impact on medical care. And while much has been written about the minds and methods of the medical professionals who save our lives, precious little has been said about their emotions. In What Doctors Feel, Dr. Danielle Ofri has taken on the task of dissecting the hidden emotional responses of doctors, and how these directly influence patients.
How do the stresses of medical life—from paperwork to grueling hours to lawsuits to facing death—affect the medical care that doctors can offer their patients? Digging deep into the lives of doctors, Ofri examines the daunting range of emotions—shame, anger, empathy, frustration, hope, pride, occasionally despair, and sometimes even love—that permeate the contemporary doctor-patient connection. Drawing on scientific studies, including some surprising research, Dr. Danielle Ofri offers up an unflinching look at the impact of emotions on health care.
With her renowned eye for dramatic detail, Dr. Ofri takes us into the swirling heart of patient care, telling stories of caregivers caught up and occasionally torn down by the whirlwind life of doctoring. She admits to the humiliation of an error that nearly killed one of her patients and her forever fear of making another. She mourns when a beloved patient is denied a heart transplant. She tells the riveting stories of an intern traumatized when she is forced to let a newborn die in her arms, and of a doctor whose daily glass of wine to handle the frustrations of the ER escalates into a destructive addiction. But doctors don’t only feel fear, grief, and frustration. Ofri also reveals that doctors tell bad jokes about “toxic sock syndrome,” cope through gallows humor, find hope in impossible situations, and surrender to ecstatic happiness when they triumph over illness.  The stories here reveal the undeniable truth that emotions have a distinct effect on how doctors care for their patients. For both clinicians and patients, understanding what doctors feel can make all the difference in giving and getting the best medical care.